Monthly Archives: April 2016

Take my $1000 genome, please!

I have just released my whole genome sequence (WGS) to the public domain (CC0, no rights reserved), via the Harvard Personal Genome Project (PGP). I believe that my data represents both the first $1000 genome-with-analysis ever performed as well as the first $1000 genome released for public use. Thank you to both the PGP and to Veritas Genetics for making this possible. I would like to specifically thank Mirza Cifric, CEO of Veritas Genetics and also Christen Hart of Veritas for acting as my liaison and dealing with my frequent email requests for status updates. From my PGP profile page you can download my genome data (as a BAM file (17.8GB) or in VCF format (383MB)), as well as my 23andMe (v3, pre-FDA letter) SNP chip data and my full mitochondrial DNA sequence as tested by FamilyTreeDNA (since deposited in GenBank as accession ID KU530226).

Why would I do this?

Put simply, I wanted to make a contribution to science. Further, since working for a genomic drug development company in the 2000s where I met, then married, a bioinformatician, I’ve had an interest in the potential applications of genomics, from what some then referred to as the “pharmaceutically tractable genome” to today’s “precision medicine”. That employer spun off an early DNA sequencing platform (454 Life Sciences pyrosequencing, the first company to complete and make public an individual human genome), and I find it fitting that an ex-employee, and one from the IT staff, not even the scientific team, would release the first public $1000 genome.

I would like to see science make some good use of my genetic data. Only a relatively small number of whole genome sequences available for scientific research without privacy or intellectual property encumbrances exist. As a participant in the PGP, by making my genome available I hope not only to directly support scientific research but to aid the PGP’s other research goal to identify the risk and consequences of having one’s genetic data available to the public without any effort at de-identification or obfuscation. I have the benefit of living in one of the few states with genetic information laws that exceed the US Federal Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act in placing restrictions on life insurance providers and others.

After my first blood labs with my current primary care doctor, she told me that I had the absolute worst blood levels of vitamin D that she had ever seen, along with the best HDL/LDL cholesterol levels she had seen. This comes from a genetic basis, not anything that I have pursued through diet or lifestyle. In fact my cholesterol should be, frankly, terrible, and though I live only a few miles south of the 45th parallel I get enough sun that lack of exposure can’t account for my vitamin D levels alone. My 23andMe data, when run through Promethease, reveals a train wreck throughput the vitamin D pathway, as well as matching many variants known to increase HDL cholesterol. With my whole genome sequence released for any imaginable use, I hope that researchers can either spot something unique enough on its own or work my data into genome wide association studies (GWAS) to tease out some drug targets or relevant alleles.

As a PGP participant I have filled out the PGP’s phenotype surveys to help associate phenotypes with my genotype. I have done the same at OpenHumans and remain willing to provide further phenotype data on request. I will attend the GET Conference and GET Labs 2016 at the end of April and get signed up with some other research studies.

You can also find my autosomal SNP chip data on GEDMatch as kit M205442, my YDNA data at ysearch under id CZVXU, and my full mitochondrial DNA sequence in GenBank as KU530226 (though services report my mtDNA haplogroup as U2e1*, I hope the next build of PhyloTree will note the mtDNA SNPs I carry extraneous to U2e1 and define a new haplogroup as with my deposition several mtDNA sequence motifs now have three independent depositions, enough to justify naming a new U2e1* branch). I have much of my genealogy traced several generations back and several apparent triangulation groups worth of matches. Genealogy traces my surname back to the Paradis in Quebec but hits a brick wall in the mid 1800s, though my YDNA 67-STR results at FTDNA show close matches with other tested Paradis males who have traceable lineages back to Pierre Paradis of Mortagne-au-Perche, France (d. 1675), apparent patriarch of new world Paradis/Pardy lines. Several of my lines go back to early US colonials (Trowbridge provides my nexus to Charlemagne, though I’ve found no Mayflower descendents), as well as mixed ancestry (French/German/more) Creoles along the German Coast in Louisiana. I also have a bit of direct Scottish (Halcro) ancestry along with other Scots-Irish.

How can a security and privacy aware individual choose to release this data?

For me, the recognition that sequencing continues to fall in price and will eventually become ubiquitous to the point of banality, coupled with the fact that we shed DNA all day long convinces me that any genetic privacy we may believe we have now exists only for a disappearing moment in history and only in lieu of a determined adversary willing to put some effort into collection. Setting aside the issue of disclosing one’s unique genetic signature to third parties, simply knowing what secrets sit in one’s own DNA empowers some individuals but makes others uneasy. Some people do not want to know if their genetics give them a high probability of Alzheimers, or a disposition to cancer. Some regulators believe they cannot trust the public to make responsible decisions once given knowledge of the forbidden fruit in their genetic code. Because science does not yet know enough about the complex interactions of all parts of the genome to determine the exact medical significance of every gene or non-gene variant, the interpretation of your static genome can and will change with the ongoing discovery of new genetic associations and with failures to replicate previously reported associations. By donating my sequence to an unencumbered public dataset I hope to help speed up this process and embolden others to take this step to share for science, with eyes wide open as to the limitations of data de-identification and possibilities of personalized medicine. Whether you share your genome through the PGP, your microbiome through uBiome, the next virus you catch through GoViral, your FitBit data through OpenHumans, your direct to consumer SNP chip results through OpenSNP, or any other data through any other platform, each of us has a unique chance to contribute to research to better lives today and our species tomorrow.

What does whole genome sequencing give a non-expert that SNP genotyping doesn’t?

Several years ago I took 23andMe’s genotyping test. As this occurred prior to the FDA sending 23andMe a nastygram barring them from reporting health-relevant results, I received a decent amount of information relevant to health issues. So why bother having a whole genome sequence done? To put it simply, a WGS has more long-term value than a genotyping SNP chip. As 23andMe V2 customers discovered, as time moves on and science learns more about genetic variants, and as new builds of the human genome get released, SNP results based on older data lose their relevance. New genome scaffolds obsolete what we believed we knew about older SNPs. New SNPs get discovered with more meaningful disease associations than those believed to associate with diseases years ago during chip design. With my whole genome sequence in my pocket, I have better positioning for the future as I can look up newly-reported variants going forward whether or not the designer of the probes on a SNP chip foresaw the relevance of that genetic region. If I develop cancer in the future, I or my medical providers can compare the sequence of a tumor cell to my genome sequence, easing the process of identifying genes that may have gone haywire and caused cancer, and potentially informing the selection of anti-cancer drugs that could save my life. Further, by ordering and releasing my whole genome sequence, scientists working with public datasets can perform more useful analyses than those available simply from releasing my SNP chip data.

Go use my data!

Updates

Mike Cariaso has graciously run Promethease against my WGS data. Results here. Unfortunately Promethease results expire after a number of days, rendering this report now inaccessible.

Securing Oracle Enterprise Manager 13c

[20170418 NOTE: I have upgraded the patches referenced in this script to reflect the latest (20170418) PSU patch for EM13cR1. I no longer have an EM13cR1 environment available with which to test this script, so please feel free to report issues or to submit a git pull request. I have now placed this script on github: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/brianpardy/em13c/master/checksec13.sh.]
[20161013 NOTE: I have upgraded to EM13cR2, and this script still works as expected. If you attempt to run it on an EM13cR2 environment please take note that all of the patch recommendations listed apply to the older EM13cR1 release and will provide incorrect results on 13.2. The TLS, certificate, and cipher strength tests all function correctly on 13.2.]

Introduction

This post continues my series on securing Oracle Enterprise Manager environments with some updates relevant to EM13c. Oracle has made significant security improvements with Oracle Enterprise Manager 13c over the prior 12c version, first released in October 2011, more than four and a half years ago at this point. In the interest of security, I have to strongly recommend that any sites still using EM12c upgrade to (or perform a fresh installation of) EM13c as soon as possible. More recent versions of EM12c like 12.1.0.5 (June 2015) continue to use the same technology stack as the initial release, and the world of security has massively changed since then. Notably, EM13c uses Java 7, WebLogic 12.1.3, and disables SSLv3 out of the box.

Just to recap, back at the EM12c original release date:

  • Practically nobody had ever heard of Edward Snowden
  • The first release of Java 7 celebrated its three month birthday
  • Two months later, Oracle released WebLogic 12c; EM12c users remained on WebLogic 10.3.6
  • One month earlier, the public learned of the BEAST attack and people still believed that using RC4 (immune to BEAST) as a workaround improved security (spoiler warning: it did not)
  • We had three years to wait before the POODLE vulnerability caused vendors to recognize the need to disable SSLv3 (you DID disable SSLv3, right?)
  • Oracle still considered the MD5 hashing algorithm good enough to use in self-signed certificates produced by EM12c, despite flaws known to exist since 1996
  • Web browsers considered the SHA-1 hashing algorithm, now also deprecated due to brokenness, good enough to use

As the security world’s known unknowns collapsed around us, proactive EM12c administrators sought to make the best of their lot. Outside of Oracle, I and others poked at the software and wrote blog articles, while inside Oracle effort proceeded to support more recent Java releases that brought with them better cipher suites and hashing algorithms, as well as the usual security fixes. This process took some time for all involved and hit a few bumps along the way.

I do not intend in this post to review general day-to-day EM13c security design such as user roles or privileges, object level security within OEM, or integration with identity providers like LDAP; only the infrastructure level issues that tend to change in brief large bursts as new attacks come out. See this excellent list of EM13c blogs, links and videos that Philip Brown has provided for more details on these and other items.

On to EM13c

EM13c admins need to keep an eye on the same sorts of items as with EM12c. We really should read the documentation, even if only the Security Guide. I admit I often do not. It contains good information.

Patches

I consider it critical for admins to keep up with the OEM periodic patches, particularly security patches. The script below covers patches up to and including March 31, 2016. I plan to update again after the next set of Oracle security patches arrives, likely mid-April.

Certificates

The process for applying certificates on EM13c does not appear to have changed significantly from the prior version. I have confirmed that the new “omspatcher” tool that replaces opatchauto when applying a system patch to the OMS works perfectly fine with certificates on WebLogic that use the SHA-256 hashing algorithm. Given the upcoming deprecation of SHA-1 across all major browsers I do not see any valid reason not to use SHA-256 with new certificates.

Ciphersuites

Out of the box, my EM13c installation rejected weak ciphersuites and accepted the strong ones. Unfortunately it still accepted some that these versions of Java and OpenSSL consider as MEDIUM strength, so I want to disable those across the entire environment, leaving only the strongest ciphersuites available in this release and permitting other ciphersuites only where necessary.

[UPDATE 20160518: Please see MOS note 2138391.1 for the official procedure to disable weak cipher suites in EM13c.]

We will have to live with these unwanted ciphersuites enabled until Oracle provides a supported procedure to disable them across the entire stack. I have performed some preliminary tests and I find it very easy to get OEM into a situation where it cannot startup after manually editing config files that define enabled ciphersuites. The script below will identify ports permitting ciphersuites you may wish to disable when a supported method becomes available.

UPDATE 20160720: Take particular care of watching the ciphersuites accepted by your agents if you upgrade the JDK that the agents use. I just attempted a JDK update on an agent from the distributed version to 1.7.0-111, and that agent began to accept LOW and MEDIUM strength ciphersuites again, thus I have omitted JDK updates for agents from the check script.

Security Checkup

Below I provide an early version of the script I use to validate EM13c security configuration. I based this on my earlier EM12c script, linked above. The script will become more useful once I implement patch level checking after release of the first set of EM13c patches, but for the moment it will inspect your EM13c environment to identify relevant ports and confirm that your system will not respond to SSLv2 or SSLv3 requests, does respond to TLSv1 requests, supports HIGH, but not LOW or MEDIUM strength ciphersuites (as defined by the version of OpenSSL installed on your OMS host), and finally checks for the presence of demonstration-not-for-production-use certificates and self-signed certificates.

(A caveat on self-signed certificate checking: OpenSSL, not this script, performs the check, therefore if OpenSSL cannot validate your certificate to a trusted root, this script cannot either. If a well known certification authority has signed your certificates, OpenSSL should validate them successfully, but it may not do so if you use an internal certificate authority to sign certificates. In that case you should install a copy of your internal CA as a trusted root certificate in the system trust store so that OpenSSL can validate your EM13c certificates. I cannot document this process for every OS but Linux users should look to the documentation for the update-ca-certificates or update-ca-trust commands. If my script below incorrectly reports your certificate as self-signed, you can ignore the finding or address the issue at the OpenSSL level.)

EM13c TLS Security Checkup Script

[LATEST UPDATE: 20161004, adds 20160920 patches and fixes TLSv1 vs TLSv1.2 bugs, version 0.9]. Thank you to Bob Schuppin who reported a bug in the use of TLSv1 to check certificate and cipher suite usage in a TLSv1.2-only site. I have modified the relevant checks to use TLSv1.2 if supported by your OpenSSL version or to stick with TLSv1 if not supported.

[PRIOR UPDATE: 20160914 bugfix and enhancements, no new patch checks, version 0.8]. Thank you to Paige who reported a bug in the check of the SSL_CIPHER_SUITES parameter. I had a typo in the cipher suite names for the SSL_CIPHER_SUITES parameter, which I have now fixed. In researching this I realized that this parameter provides control over SSL/TLS authentication for clients, which I do not use in my environment. Instead I use native SQL*Net encryption, controlled by the various ENCRYPTION_(CLIENT|SERVER), ENCRYPTION_TYPES_(CLIENT|SERVER), CRYPTO_CHECKSUM_(CLIENT|SERVER), and CRYPTO_CHECKSUM_TYPES_(CLIENT|SERVER) parameters, which I have added into the script. The script will check to make sure that you do not permit MD5 as a SQL*Net checksum algorithm and that you do not permit DES, DES40, 3DES112, nor any of the RC4_ algorithms for SQL*Net encryption. Unfortunately due to bug 23587582, you will encounter problems promoting targets in OEM unless you allow use of the 3DES168 encryption algorithm and SHA1 hashing algorithm. Generally I would prefer to disable both of those for security reasons but I will permit them in this script as long as they remain necessary for full OEM functionality.

[PRIOR UPDATE: 20160819 for 20160816 bundle patches, version 0.7]. With this update, I have added support for TLSv1.1 and TLSv1.2 to the protocol checks. I have also added support for the optional SLES11 openssl1 package which provides a newer OpenSSL supporting TLSv1.1 and TLSv1.2 for systems on SLES11 like mine. The script will now dynamically determine (by parsing the “openssl s_client help” output) if your OpenSSL version supports TLSv1.2. If your OpenSSL version DOES support TLSv1.2, the script will now flag any support of TLSv1 or TLSv1.1 as a failure in your OEM stack. If your OpenSSL does NOT support TLSv1.2, the script will consider TLSv1 support in OEM as acceptable. If you notice problems with this new functionality please let me know.

Compatibility

Only tested on Linux x86-64, but may work on AIX and Solaris as the EM12c version I built this upon did work there. Planned future enhancements include checking that you have disabled non-encrypted HTTP access to EM13c components, upgraded Java to the most recent EM13c-supported release, and more.

You can download the latest version of the script from github: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/brianpardy/em13c/master/checksec13.sh.

EM13c TLS Security Checkup Script Sample Output


Performing EM13c security checkup version 0.9 on omshost.domain.com at Tue Oct 4 11:04:43 EDT 2016.

Using port definitions from configuration files
/etc/oragchomelist
/oracle/oem/gc_inst/em/EMGC_OMS1/emgc.properties
/oracle/oem/gc_inst/em/EMGC_OMS1/embip.properties

Agent port found at omshost.domain.com:3872
BIPublisher port found at omshost.domain.com:9803
BIPublisherOHS port found at omshost.domain.com:9851
NodeManager port found at omshost.domain.com:7403
OMSconsole port found at omshost.domain.com:7802
OMSproxy port found at omshost.domain.com:7301
OMSupload port found at omshost.domain.com:4903
WLSadmin found at omshost.domain.com:7102

Repository DB version=12.1.0.2.0 SID=oemdb host=omshost.domain.com

Using OPENSSL=/usr/bin/openssl1 (has TLS1_2=2)
Repository DB on OMS server, will check patches/parameters in /oracle/oem/product/12.1.0/db

(1) Checking SSL/TLS configuration (see notes 1602983.1, 1477287.1, 1905314.1)

(1a) Forbid SSLv2 connections
Confirming ssl2 disabled for Agent at omshost.domain.com:3872... OK
Confirming ssl2 disabled for BIPublisher at omshost.domain.com:9803... OK
Confirming ssl2 disabled for NodeManager at omshost.domain.com:7403... OK
Confirming ssl2 disabled for BIPublisherOHS at omshost.domain.com:9851... OK
Confirming ssl2 disabled for OMSconsole at omshost.domain.com:7802... OK
Confirming ssl2 disabled for OMSproxy at omshost.domain.com:7301... OK
Confirming ssl2 disabled for OMSupload at omshost.domain.com:4903... OK
Confirming ssl2 disabled for WLSadmin at omshost.domain.com:7102... OK

(1b) Forbid SSLv3 connections
Confirming ssl3 disabled for Agent at omshost.domain.com:3872... OK
Confirming ssl3 disabled for BIPublisher at omshost.domain.com:9803... OK
Confirming ssl3 disabled for NodeManager at omshost.domain.com:7403... OK
Confirming ssl3 disabled for BIPublisherOHS at omshost.domain.com:9851... OK
Confirming ssl3 disabled for OMSconsole at omshost.domain.com:7802... OK
Confirming ssl3 disabled for OMSproxy at omshost.domain.com:7301... OK
Confirming ssl3 disabled for OMSupload at omshost.domain.com:4903... OK
Confirming ssl3 disabled for WLSadmin at omshost.domain.com:7102... OK

(1c) Forbid TLSv1 connections
Confirming tls1 disabled for Agent at omshost.domain.com:3872... FAILED
Confirming tls1 disabled for BIPublisher at omshost.domain.com:9803... FAILED
Confirming tls1 disabled for NodeManager at omshost.domain.com:7403... FAILED
Confirming tls1 disabled for BIPublisherOHS at omshost.domain.com:9851... FAILED
Confirming tls1 disabled for OMSconsole at omshost.domain.com:7802... FAILED
Confirming tls1 disabled for OMSproxy at omshost.domain.com:7301... FAILED
Confirming tls1 disabled for OMSupload at omshost.domain.com:4903... FAILED
Confirming tls1 disabled for WLSadmin at omshost.domain.com:7102... FAILED

(1c) Forbid TLSv1.1 connections
Confirming tls1_1 disabled for Agent at omshost.domain.com:3872... FAILED
Confirming tls1_1 disabled for BIPublisher at omshost.domain.com:9803... FAILED
Confirming tls1_1 disabled for NodeManager at omshost.domain.com:7403... FAILED
Confirming tls1_1 disabled for BIPublisherOHS at omshost.domain.com:9851... FAILED
Confirming tls1_1 disabled for OMSconsole at omshost.domain.com:7802... FAILED
Confirming tls1_1 disabled for OMSproxy at omshost.domain.com:7301... FAILED
Confirming tls1_1 disabled for OMSupload at omshost.domain.com:4903... FAILED
Confirming tls1_1 disabled for WLSadmin at omshost.domain.com:7102... FAILED

(1c) Permit TLSv1.2 connections
Confirming tls1_2 available for Agent at omshost.domain.com:3872... OK
Confirming tls1_2 available for BIPublisher at omshost.domain.com:9803... OK
Confirming tls1_2 available for NodeManager at omshost.domain.com:7403... OK
Confirming tls1_2 available for BIPublisherOHS at omshost.domain.com:9851... OK
Confirming tls1_2 available for OMSconsole at omshost.domain.com:7802... OK
Confirming tls1_2 available for OMSproxy at omshost.domain.com:7301... OK
Confirming tls1_2 available for OMSupload at omshost.domain.com:4903... OK
Confirming tls1_2 available for WLSadmin at omshost.domain.com:7102... OK

(2) Checking supported ciphers at SSL/TLS endpoints (see notes 2138391.1, 1067411.1)
Checking LOW strength ciphers on Agent (omshost.domain.com:3872, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking MEDIUM strength ciphers on Agent (omshost.domain.com:3872)... OK
Checking HIGH strength ciphers on Agent (omshost.domain.com:3872)... OK

Checking LOW strength ciphers on BIPublisher (omshost.domain.com:9803, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking MEDIUM strength ciphers on BIPublisher (omshost.domain.com:9803)... OK
Checking HIGH strength ciphers on BIPublisher (omshost.domain.com:9803)... OK

Checking LOW strength ciphers on NodeManager (omshost.domain.com:7403, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking MEDIUM strength ciphers on NodeManager (omshost.domain.com:7403)... OK
Checking HIGH strength ciphers on NodeManager (omshost.domain.com:7403)... OK

Checking LOW strength ciphers on BIPublisherOHS (omshost.domain.com:9851, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking MEDIUM strength ciphers on BIPublisherOHS (omshost.domain.com:9851)... OK
Checking HIGH strength ciphers on BIPublisherOHS (omshost.domain.com:9851)... OK

Checking LOW strength ciphers on OMSconsole (omshost.domain.com:7802, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking MEDIUM strength ciphers on OMSconsole (omshost.domain.com:7802)... OK
Checking HIGH strength ciphers on OMSconsole (omshost.domain.com:7802)... OK

Checking LOW strength ciphers on OMSproxy (omshost.domain.com:7301, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking MEDIUM strength ciphers on OMSproxy (omshost.domain.com:7301)... OK
Checking HIGH strength ciphers on OMSproxy (omshost.domain.com:7301)... OK

Checking LOW strength ciphers on OMSupload (omshost.domain.com:4903, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking MEDIUM strength ciphers on OMSupload (omshost.domain.com:4903)... OK
Checking HIGH strength ciphers on OMSupload (omshost.domain.com:4903)... OK

Checking LOW strength ciphers on WLSadmin (omshost.domain.com:7102, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking MEDIUM strength ciphers on WLSadmin (omshost.domain.com:7102)... OK
Checking HIGH strength ciphers on WLSadmin (omshost.domain.com:7102)... OK

(3) Checking self-signed and demonstration certificates at SSL/TLS endpoints (see notes 1367988.1, 1399293.1, 1593183.1, 1527874.1, 123033.1, 1937457.1)
Checking certificate at Agent (omshost.domain.com:3872, protocol tls1_2)... FAILED - Found self-signed certificate
Checking demo certificate at Agent (omshost.domain.com:3872, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking certificate at BIPublisher (omshost.domain.com:9803, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking demo certificate at BIPublisher (omshost.domain.com:9803, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking certificate at NodeManager (omshost.domain.com:7403, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking demo certificate at NodeManager (omshost.domain.com:7403, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking certificate at BIPublisherOHS (omshost.domain.com:9851, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking demo certificate at BIPublisherOHS (omshost.domain.com:9851, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking certificate at OMSconsole (omshost.domain.com:7802, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking demo certificate at OMSconsole (omshost.domain.com:7802, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking certificate at OMSproxy (omshost.domain.com:7301, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking demo certificate at OMSproxy (omshost.domain.com:7301, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking certificate at OMSupload (omshost.domain.com:4903, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking demo certificate at OMSupload (omshost.domain.com:4903, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking certificate at WLSadmin (omshost.domain.com:7102, protocol tls1_2)... OK
Checking demo certificate at WLSadmin (omshost.domain.com:7102, protocol tls1_2)... OK

(4) Checking EM13c Oracle home patch levels against 20 Sep 2016 baseline (see notes 1664074.1, 1900943.1, 822485.1, 1470197.1, 1967243.1)

(4a) OMS REPOSITORY DATABASE HOME (/oracle/oem/product/12.1.0/db) PSU 12.1.0.2.160719 (JUL2016) (23054246)... OK
Patch 23054246 : applied on Wed Jul 20 12:01:53 EDT 2016 Patch description: "Database Patch Set Update : 12.1.0.2.160719 (23054246)"

(4a) OMS REPOSITORY DATABASE HOME (/oracle/oem/product/12.1.0/db) ORACLE JAVAVM COMPONENT 12.1.0.2.160719 DATABASE PSU (JUL2016) (23177536)... OK
Patch 23177536 : applied on Wed Jul 20 12:03:14 EDT 2016 21566993, 22670413, 19699946, 23177536, 22118835, 22118851, 19895326

(4b) OMS REPOSITORY DATABASE HOME (/oracle/oem/product/12.1.0/db) sqlnet.ora SQLNET.ENCRYPTION_TYPES_SERVER parameter (76629.1, 2167682.1)... OK
(AES128,AES256,AES192,3DES168)

(4b) OMS REPOSITORY DATABASE HOME (/oracle/oem/product/12.1.0/db) sqlnet.ora SQLNET.ENCRYPTION_SERVER parameter (76629.1, 2167682.1)... OK
requested

(4b) OMS REPOSITORY DATABASE HOME (/oracle/oem/product/12.1.0/db) sqlnet.ora SQLNET.ENCRYPTION_TYPES_CLIENT parameter (76629.1, 2167682.1)... OK
(AES128,AES256,AES192,3DES168)

(4b) OMS REPOSITORY DATABASE HOME (/oracle/oem/product/12.1.0/db) sqlnet.ora SQLNET.ENCRYPTION_CLIENT parameter (76629.1, 2167682.1)... OK
requested

(4b) OMS REPOSITORY DATABASE HOME (/oracle/oem/product/12.1.0/db) sqlnet.ora SQLNET.CRYPTO_CHECKSUM_TYPES_SERVER parameter (76629.1, 2167682.1)... OK
(SHA1)

(4b) OMS REPOSITORY DATABASE HOME (/oracle/oem/product/12.1.0/db) sqlnet.ora SQLNET.CRYPTO_CHECKSUM_SERVER parameter (76629.1, 2167682.1)... OK
requested

(4b) OMS REPOSITORY DATABASE HOME (/oracle/oem/product/12.1.0/db) sqlnet.ora SQLNET.CRYPTO_CHECKSUM_TYPES_CLIENT parameter (76629.1, 2167682.1)... OK
(SHA1)

(4b) OMS REPOSITORY DATABASE HOME (/oracle/oem/product/12.1.0/db) sqlnet.ora SQLNET.CRYPTO_CHECKSUM_CLIENT parameter (76629.1, 2167682.1)... OK
requested

(4b) OMS REPOSITORY DATABASE HOME (/oracle/oem/product/12.1.0/db) sqlnet.ora SSL_VERSION parameter (1545816.1)... OK
1.0

(4b) OMS REPOSITORY DATABASE HOME (/oracle/oem/product/12.1.0/db) sqlnet.ora SSL_CIPHER_SUITES parameter (1545816.1)... OK
(SSL_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA,SSL_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA)

(4b) OMS REPOSITORY DATABASE HOME (/oracle/oem/product/12.1.0/db) listener.ora SSL_VERSION parameter (1545816.1)... OK
1.0

(4b) OMS REPOSITORY DATABASE HOME (/oracle/oem/product/12.1.0/db) listener.ora SSL_CIPHER_SUITES parameter (1545816.1)... OK
(SSL_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA,SSL_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA)

(4c) *UPDATED* OMS CHAINED AGENT HOME (/oracle/oem/agent13cR1/agent_13.1.0.0.0) EM-AGENT BUNDLE PATCH 13.1.0.0.160920 (24437699)... OK
Patch 24437699 : applied on Tue Sep 27 12:08:23 EDT 2016 24437699, 21779343, 22616051, 23759799, 22988508, 23089106, 23581450

(4c) *UPDATED* OMS CHAINED AGENT HOME (/oracle/oem/agent13cR1/agent_13.1.0.0.0) EM DB PLUGIN BUNDLE PATCH 13.1.1.0.160920 MONITORING (24545984)... OK
Patch 24545984 : applied on Tue Sep 27 13:46:08 EDT 2016 22908077, 23294830, 22503390, 23075475, 23697777, 24545984, 24296310

(4c) *UPDATED* OMS CHAINED AGENT HOME (/oracle/oem/agent13cR1/agent_13.1.0.0.0) EM DB PLUGIN BUNDLE PATCH 13.1.1.0.160920 DISCOVERY (24545989)... OK
Patch 24545989 : applied on Tue Sep 27 13:46:11 EDT 2016 23523964, 23294839, 24545989, 23226583, 24408840

(4c) *UPDATED* OMS CHAINED AGENT HOME (/oracle/oem/agent13cR1/agent_13.1.0.0.0) EM FMW PLUGIN BUNDLE PATCH 13.1.1.0.160920 MONITORING (24658006)... OK
Patch 24658006 : applied on Tue Sep 27 13:46:13 EDT 2016 22834135, 23007497, 22447329, 22936491, 24658006, 23294872, 23306887

(4c) OMS CHAINED AGENT HOME (/oracle/oem/agent13cR1/agent_13.1.0.0.0) EM SI PLUGIN BUNDLE PATCH 13.1.1.0.160719 MONITORING (23697783)... OK
Patch 23697783 : applied on Wed Jul 20 10:53:57 EDT 2016 22128210, 23338028, 23189991, 22823189, 21253819, 23697783, 23208587

(4c) OMS CHAINED AGENT HOME (/oracle/oem/agent13cR1/agent_13.1.0.0.0) EM SI PLUGIN BUNDLE PATCH 13.1.1.0.160531 DISCOVERY (23294895)... OK
Patch 23294895 : applied on Thu Jun 16 11:28:18 EDT 2016 23197299, 23294895

(4c) OMS CHAINED AGENT HOME (/oracle/oem/agent13cR1/agent_13.1.0.0.0) EM OH PLUGIN BUNDLE PATCH 13.1.1.0.160429 (23135564)... OK
Patch 23135564 : applied on Wed May 11 13:21:35 EDT 2016 22521822, 23135564

(4d) *UPDATED* OMS HOME (/oracle/oem/Middleware13cR1) ENTERPRISE MANAGER FOR OMS PLUGINS 13.1.1.0.160920 (24546113)... OK
oracle.sysman.emas.oms.plugin/13.1.1.0.0 Plugin 24546113 24437669 oracle.sysman.cfw.oms.plugin/13.1.1.0.0 Plugin 24546113 24437711 oracle.sysman.db.oms.plugin/13.1.1.0.0 Plugin 24546113 24437646 oracle.sysman.xa.oms.plugin/13.1.1.0.0 Plugin 24546113 24437656

(4d) (/oracle/oem/Middleware13cR1) WLS PATCH SET UPDATE 12.1.3.0.160719 (23094292)... OK
Patch 23094292 : applied on Wed Jul 20 12:27:53 EDT 2016

(4f) OMS HOME (/oracle/oem/Middleware13cR1) ENTERPRISE MANAGER BASE PLATFORM PATCH SET UPDATE 13.1.0.0.160719 (23134365)... OK
oracle.sysman.top.oms/13.1.0.0.0 Core 23134365 23134365

(5) Checking EM13c Java patch levels against 20 Sep 2016 baseline (see notes 1492980.1, 1616397.1)

(5a) WLS (/oracle/oem/Middleware13cR1/oracle_common/jdk) JAVA SE JDK VERSION 1.7.0-111 (13079846)... OK
1.7.0_111

Failed test count: 17 - Review output

sslcheck:Agent @ omshost.domain.com:3872:tls1 protocol connection allowed
sslcheck:BIPublisher @ omshost.domain.com:9803:tls1 protocol connection allowed
sslcheck:NodeManager @ omshost.domain.com:7403:tls1 protocol connection allowed
sslcheck:BIPublisherOHS @ omshost.domain.com:9851:tls1 protocol connection allowed
sslcheck:OMSconsole @ omshost.domain.com:7802:tls1 protocol connection allowed
sslcheck:OMSproxy @ omshost.domain.com:7301:tls1 protocol connection allowed
sslcheck:OMSupload @ omshost.domain.com:4903:tls1 protocol connection allowed
sslcheck:WLSadmin @ omshost.domain.com:7102:tls1 protocol connection allowed
sslcheck:Agent @ omshost.domain.com:3872:tls1_1 protocol connection allowed
sslcheck:BIPublisher @ omshost.domain.com:9803:tls1_1 protocol connection allowed
sslcheck:NodeManager @ omshost.domain.com:7403:tls1_1 protocol connection allowed
sslcheck:BIPublisherOHS @ omshost.domain.com:9851:tls1_1 protocol connection allowed
sslcheck:OMSconsole @ omshost.domain.com:7802:tls1_1 protocol connection allowed
sslcheck:OMSproxy @ omshost.domain.com:7301:tls1_1 protocol connection allowed
sslcheck:OMSupload @ omshost.domain.com:4903:tls1_1 protocol connection allowed
sslcheck:WLSadmin @ omshost.domain.com:7102:tls1_1 protocol connection allowed
certcheck:Agent @ omshost.domain.com:3872 found self-signed certificate

Visit https://pardydba.wordpress.com/2016/04/05/securing-oracle-enterprise-manager-13c/ for the latest version.

Elderflower Vanilla Fizz

A Friday afternoon on April Fool’s Day seems like a good time to return to my earlier plan to write about liquor as the Data Driven Drinker. So I give you the elderflower vanilla fizz, or the Madonna. This cocktail uses local Vermont ingredients from St Johnsbury and Warren.

The elderflower rum gives a light semisweet flavor up front that compares favorably to a liqueur (e.g. St Germain) . The vanilla rum balances it out and shows on the finish. Vary the amount of ice and club soda according to taste.

Ingredients:

1 ounce Dunc’s Mill Elderflower Rum
1 ounce Mad River Distillers’ Vanilla Rum
1/2 ounce lemon juice
1/2 ounce simple syrup
4 ounces club soda
Ice

Shake rum, lemon juice and simple syrup with ice and strain into a long glass over ice. Top with club soda and garnish with lemon slice.

image

Elderflower Vanilla Fizz